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20121027
20121104
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 54 (some duplicates have been removed)
the impact on our economy. and on transportation. you know, the election will take care of itself next week. >> and here is what governor romney said. >> on the eastern coast of our nation, a lot of people are enduring some very difficult times. >> and our hearts and our prayers go to them as we think about how tough it is going to be there. i don't think there has been a hurricane in ohio in a long time. but there have been some hurricanes that have caused a lot of damage across this country and hurt a lot of families and their families are in harm's ways that will be hurt either in their possessions or perhaps even something more severe. >> we have faced these kind of challenges before and as we have, it is good to see how americans come together and this looks le another time when we need to come together, all across the country, even here in ohio and make sure we give of our support of the people who need it. >> rose: several national polls have the president and governor romney in a virtual dead heat coming down the stretch, some others have different results when you look at the swing
on the economy. and so the first priority for any new president ought to be figuring out how we can reduce unemployment by some significant measure. >> jamelle bouie is with the american prospect magazine. he contends mitt romney's proposals to cut personal income and corporate taxes, reduce the size of government, roll back regulation and boost energy exploration could generate jobs but only over the long term. moody's analytics estimated that the president's proposed jobs act would have generated 1.9 million jobs through infrastructure projects, the rehiring of public employees, and tax credits. but the bill was blocked in congress. given that. >> it's simply the case that neither candidate has a plan for dealing with the immediate jobs crisis. >> there's not a whole lot of discussion going on about how to promote jobs right now. because what one would normally talk about is more stimulus, either more government spending or more tax cuts. but the deficit situation has now grown so bad that there's just no appetite for further borrowing at this time. >> maya macguineas runs the committee
and the economy, we can't wait around until we know for certain we need to take steps now. >> rose: that's what the mayorpoind to, carbon attacks or maybe able to measure carbon standards. where is there a model, steve, of a city in the world that's responded to the challenge? >> well, it depends on how much wealth you have. i mean holland, the netherlands is essentially an engineered country that if in the absence of its wealth and its willingness to spend that wealth on engineering the seas to keep low lands occupied by dutch people, it wouldn't be a viable country. the question for t ited states is because we are a coastal country with, as one of the other guests said 4 million people at least at high tide never mind back up a bit to account for three feet of higher seas in 30 or 40 years. this is not a problem that can be solved by engineering alone. not on a national scale. manhattan could solve it by engineering is alone, at least for half a century but the whole count c. e question is really from a policy perspective, from a taxpayer's perspective, trying to break the cycle of, i think p
get a comprehensive program. i do believe that's one of the reasons the economy is sluggish now. it was 2012 where the banks started increasing their loan. if you make the banks all profitable again it will take care of the rest of the economy and it doesn't work that way. >> rose: so you're not happy with the tarp program which others see as a success? >> how do you define "succs?" we ddn't go ove the cff. >> rose: and a lot of the loans have been paid back. >> on a cash-flow basis the tarp investment money has made money. if you look at it from a subs key standpoint-- in order, if citypaid 5% dividend, if they had to go to the market what would they have had to pay? it will never turn a profit on that basis. >> rose: the financial structure was so bad the interest rates would have been so high. >> people differ on how they measure costs, and ithi, again,n a subdy bas, if you looked at subsidies, they would not have made my -- >> rose: there is this. whenever i read about you during that time or whenever i talked to you, whenever i sat next to you at some event, the central thi
that economy is booming so fast that no one can control it anymore. for me the ahasing thing is that i can say that in relation to "silent house" is that i've been living for 60 years. there've vn times that i've come back this or that that the change i sa in th first 45 years less than the change i saw in the last 15 years. >> wow. how is it different? change in the last 15? is it just velocity? >> velocity. immense economical -- political change is more development of say -- development of free speech and liberal society and because of economics and it's hard to control turkey anyre. it's s ri and coming that it's hard to crush it down and control it. >> rose: as i a writer do you -- and because of the run in you had you were criticized for criticizing turkey, correct? >> yes. >> rose: they arrested you. >> no. >> rose: well, they didn't arrest you but -- >> i was fined but then it was dropped because of international pressure. >> rose: exactly. i understand that. do you fear at all now what you have to be careful that you make sure what you say is understood for what you mean? >> these are
to was economy university. i did it for a year. then two years of law. basically i didn't really know what i wanted to do. and it seemed the right thing that my parents said as long as you study we will pay for everything. so i did this university for three years. and then i had a stint at san diego, california, which is a place that i really adore. but i guess i was looking more for a new york energy and it didn't have it. so i then went to london, 1976, to study kpun cases. i went to california to do international relations then went to london-- it was really just any excuse to be able to be kept by my parents in a way. in london i fell into photography. >> rose: how did you fall into it. >> it's a really funny story. i believe so much that things come to you. and basically i went to a friend's house for lunch and there was a foted owe of himself on his mantle piece. and i said what a great photograph. and he told me this girl studying photography here took it. i said i have always heard of this girl i would love to meet her. i went to meet her at her school. when a rifed if he school she
books and the economy of ebooks is much more attractive no paper cost no printing, no contribution cost, no returns. >> no returns. >> huge advance, so at what point do publishers say hey, i have-- it's crazy to me economically to be publishings and printing booksing printing books, not publishing ebooks that is such a good point because in most other countries there were no hard bound booksment we did hard cover to help our p & l, our profit and loss statement. i do think that the hard cover book will start to diminish in quantity, yes. i don't believe that the publisher, that a true publisher will ever give up on printing physical books. >> i disagree with that. >> but, well, but i will talk to you about that. because i think that there will always be a want and a need for a certain group of society to have the printed book. and perhaps the printed book will become even more expensive and more valuable because it will be printed better and it will be done on better paper, et cetera. but i think the point of marketing is where this is all, where this all comes to. and how do you now sell your book
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 54 (some duplicates have been removed)